A recent appalling news item concerned a woman who unsuccessfully attempted to restore a fresco.  To say she is an amateur is an understatement.  For those of you who are unaware of the story:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-19349921

It triggered a memory of an anecdote a photograph restoration expert shared with me years ago (although not as horrific as the fresco tragedy).

A client brought him a portrait of his mother taken in the 1940’s that required restoration.  The client’s parents had married, divorced, re-married, re-divorced, and so, the portrait has been torn lengthwise, and horizontal-wise.  The photograph was restored, but the client told him that, although beautiful, it didn’t look like his mother.

The restorer had a sit down with a forensics expert, who taught him about bone structure.

Now fully armed with this additional knowledge, he returned to the portrait, and, voila, client says, “Perfect.”

If you have any photographs that require restoration due to damage by mold, light exposure, etc., and basic restoration techniques may not be enough, interview different restoration service providers about their background.

As Mom used to say, “If you’re going to do a job, do it right.” Your ancestors would be pleased.

You Are A Classic

About these ads